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Thursday, June 25, 2015

And You See What?

This week I posted a photo of an untitled diptych. And there were a number of comments of the interpretation of the images. Of course, I did not paint any image which was perceptible. Actually, the difficulty in being an abstract painting is to ensure that no representational form sneaks into the work. I cannot fathom how or where some of these "seen" objects come from. Yesterday evening I watched a documentary on Schizophrenia; one of the most common symptoms is seeing imaginary things which are clearly not present in reality. You laugh. I am certainly not accusing my viewers of any mental disorder; on the contrary. Imagination is the trigger for association with an image. But it did make me wary. How to engage a viewer without attaching reality to my paintings. If you like what you think you are seeing, well, that's a good reason to hang the piece in your home. But if the image you have conjured isn't pleasant to your psyche, the painting is rejected. What a fine line I walk when I choose to lay down colour, form, composition, etc. So when people claim that they can easily replicate abstract work, I challenge them. Go ahead. You will appreciate my work so much more.

 

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

hannahreimartistca: Square Life

hannahreimartistca: Square Life: Acrylic/Mixed Media On Canvas 30"x30"- Ready to hang wired- unframed            $1025 Canadian. Shipping and taxes extra. Co...

Square Life

Acrylic/Mixed MediaOn Canvas
30"x30"- Ready to hang wired- unframed
           $1025 Canadian. Shipping and taxes extra. Contact : hannah.reim@ hotmail.com



No words, just glorious colour and texture to grace your post- contemporary style.

Sunday, October 27, 2013

hannahreimartistca: Marks, Water and Mystery

hannahreimartistca: Marks, Water and Mystery: LIQUID LADDER- Watercolour on paper by Hannah Reim-Artist There are times that inspiration for a painting is buried so deeply in the unconscious

Marks, Water and Mystery

LIQUID LADDER- Watercolour on paper by Hannah Reim-Artist
There are times that inspiration for a painting is buried  deeply in the unconscious creative mind. I look at the sheet of paper before me. Nothing. I wait. And wait.

Then I release the images floating around and decide to free the beast. My hands have a life of their own and I throw down. Literally it is a battle royale  between the mind and the spirit. And voila. The brush moves itself in the most mysterious directions without any conscious  input. A construct of pure movement and a tango  between the hands and the brush. And the paper. And the paint. And water flowing, flying, splashing the walls. You are jealous, right? 

My ability to zone out intellectually is my gift to myself. And sometimes to you.

The resulting image is a mystery, a collision. And ultimately, the exact feeling I was looking for all along.

Saturday, May 18, 2013

hannahreimartistca: Ramblings from a SketchbookAfter posting blog ent...

hannahreimartistca: Ramblings from a Sketchbook
After posting blog ent...
: Ramblings from a Sketchbook After posting blog entries with the "finished" product, I thought it was a good opportunity to...

Ramblings from a Sketchbook

Ramblings from a Sketchbook


After posting blog entries with the "finished" product, I thought it was a good opportunity to go back in time. I am not a fan of process as I have mentioned on many occasions. Rarely, do I lose myself in the actual task at hand. Yes, that's right. My art is a task, and I am a reluctant taskmaster. In other words... fearful of the final outcome of my hand and heart.

When I thought about the actual pleasure derived from decades of producing art, I reverted to looking through my many sketchbooks. A tribute to the real freedom and outpouring of the artistic construct -without hesitation. Without thought of opinion, judgement and critique of  anyone other than myself (and sometimes my art teacher).

Shockingly good, I thought after turning pages. The earlier the sketch, the more I liked the piece. Does that mean that the less trepidation I was feeling about laying down an image, the better the work? All the knowledge I have gained has coloured (excuse me) my ability to really paint or pot with reckless abandon. Is that a good thing? Who knows. Early work is rarely superior to a mature eye and hand. But tell me. Are not these sketches powerful, emotive and meaningful?

But it's too late. You can't go home. Or back to your initial instinct in art. My head is filled with unabashed fodder- educated and cemented in years of lectures and published how to's. The drive to be free is still there but tempered somewhat. Art education is critical- I always say that deconstruction can only be achieved when the parameters of formality of technique are firmly in place.

Happily, my sketchbooks make me feel successful, talented and confident- momentarily,but I can always go there with these overstuffed, private and dog-eared journals of my travels in art.